The Beginner’s Guide to Online Donations

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Fundraising Goals, Target Markets and Your Nonprofit’s Story. Ch. 7

Learn to set fundraising goals for your nonprofit, discover and define your target markets, and tell your nonprofit’s story. Specifically, in a sound bite, let’s make this sound attractive to your new, potential supporters.

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Each of the 10 chapters include 3 step-by-step guides that lead you in setting up a modern website, launching a donor newsletter program and accepting online donations. See what the 30 guides include.
 
 
Today we are presenting Chapter 7 on marketing, communications and setting fundraising goals so you can get started driving the right people to your website and perfecting their experience.
 
Chapter 7. Marketing and Communications. Fundraising Goals, Target Markets and Your Nonprofit’s Story.
Here is a quick summary of the 4 steps in the chapter:
Tab 1. The Importance of marketing, communications and fundraising goals: Overview of Chapter 7.
Tab 2. Guide 19. Get specific about your fundraising goals.
Tab 3. Guide 20. Who are the new nonprofit supporters you are hoping to reach?
Tab 4. Guide 21. In a sound bite: What does your nonprofit do?
 
Chapter 7 is set-up for you in the 4 tabs just below.
 
Marketing, communications and fundraising goals. Determine what to market to whom: Time Requirement.
  1. Overview: 15 minutes.
  2. Fundraising goals. 1 Hour.
  3. Target market: 1 hour.
  4. What does your nonprofit do? 45 minutes.
Total Time for Chapter 7. Three Hours. In this chapter you will learn about 1) setting fundraising goals for your nonprofit in preparation for developing a communications calendar. 2) Discovering and defining who your target market is. And, 3) in a sound bite: Tell your nonprofit’s story.
Chapter 7 is set-up for you in the 4 tabs below.
 
Tabs for Chapter 7: Fundraising Goals, Target Markets and Your Nonprofit’s Story:
Get free access to the Beginner’s Guide to Online Donations here. Each of the 10 chapters includes 3 individual, step-by-step guides to boosting online fundraising: 30 guides in total. See the syllabus.
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CHAPTER 7 OVERVIEW. Marketing and Communications. Fundraising Goals, Target Markets and Your Nonprofit’s Story.
 
This week in Chapter 7 we’re going to learn about 1) setting fundraising goals for your nonprofit in preparation for next week’s communications calendar. 2) Discovering and defining who your target market is. And 3) telling your nonprofit’s story in a sound bite.
 
NB: These three simple exercises are just to get you started. The information that you develop here will be expanded on over the next few weeks.
 
 
Guide 19. Your needs: get specific about your fundraising goals. Do you want supporters that are donors, volunteers, subscribers? How many?
 
In the first section of Chapter 7, you will start off by being highly specific about your fundraising goals. For the purposes of this course, I don’t mean for you to organize a weekend board retreat to develop a new goal statement for your organization. Let’s take this from a more practical standpoint—using basic information that you already probably have at hand; think about new levels of donations and volunteers you want to reach.
 
Guide 20. Who are these new nonprofit supporters you are hoping to reach? What causes do they want to support?
 
This week, were going to jump right into the deep end of one of the most important parts about engaging with potential supporters of your organization. It will be an exercise in beginning to identify—very specifically—who they are.
 
Guide 21. What does your nonprofit do? Specifically, in a sound bite, let’s make your nonprofit’s story sound attractive to your new, potential supporters.
 
This week start off by being as specific as you can about what your organization can offer supporters in the single goal that you chose to focus on in the past two assignments.
 
Get Going!
So now, click on the second tab to learn about identifying and describing your fundraising goals. Click on the third tab to learn how to identify and describe your target market. And click on the fourth tab to learn ways to tell your nonprofit’s story that sounds attractive to your new, potential supporters.
 
Next week, in the next chapter (Chapter 8), we’re going to learn about planning campaigns—and then launching one.
 
Enjoy. See you next week.
 
 
 
CHAPTER 7. Marketing and Communications. Fundraising Goals, Target Markets and Your Nonprofit’s Story.
 
Guide 19 Your Needs. Get specific about your fundraising goals. Do you want supporters that are donors, volunteers, subscribers? How many?
 
Experience this chapter as part of a teacher led Nonprofit Fundraising Certificate Program. Each of these guides included in this chapter summarize a weekly assignment that has real tools for you to download, print out, edit, and use as templates over and over again in launching new initiatives.
 
Digital communication is extremely powerful—partially due to its ability to be highly specific. Over the next few chapters you will learn how to use digital communication tools to better target specific types of individuals looking for specific types of things.
 
So…. we might as well start off by being highly specific about our fundraising goals. For the purposes of this course, I don’t mean for you to organize a weekend board retreat to develop a new goal statement for your organization. Let’s take this from a more practical standpoint—using basic information that you already probably have at hand. These could be examples (for simplicity) for an organization doing $100k a year:
  • Fundraising goals: 80% of your funding comes from grants—and you’re hoping to get 20% ($20k) from online donations. You’re already getting $10,000 from your existing online donor base. Since average online donations are $100 you will need 100 new donors this year to get to $20k. You should also decide whether the donors can be from a national audience, or due to context, specific to your metropolitan area.
  • Volunteers: You run a local food bank and are looking for eight rotating volunteers to each work once a month (2 volunteers per week x 4 weeks = 8). Or, your organization does a consciousness-raising fall cleanup of the city park and you’re looking for 50 high school students for a morning cleanup in October. Alternatively, you could organize a golf tournament for a mature audience of 50 people.
  • Mailing list: You have a newsletter mailing list of 5,000 subscribers and you would like to double that over three years. With normal attrition, that would equate to about 2000 new subscribers per year. And although your mailing list has been good to you over the past few years, you would like to see the new subscribers be more a more targeted group that will be supportive of your programs.
 
So in this relatively simple goal list, you will identify specific themes, dollars and numbers, locations, and timelines.
 
Finally, in this assignment, you’re going to prioritize one of these goals as being the goal to work on for a communications campaign in chapter 8.
 
We’re going to focus on only one campaign in order to keep things simple. Starting off simply will give you a better learning experience and will lead to better, more effective initial campaigns and your ability to improve upon them over time. Having learned how to do this with one campaign will let you replicate the strategies that you learned for future, new campaigns.
 
Getting started.
So let’s get going. Here’s what we’re going to do in this week.
 
This Assignment: Your First Step
First: Get specific about your fundraising goals and communications goals. Do you want supporters that are donors, volunteers, subscribers? How many?
  • What are you hoping to achieve (brainstorm the different thematic areas that you are trying to increase or improve)?
  • Examples may include building your donor subscription list, driving people to your website, branding, donations, or a volunteer program.
  • Prioritize your list of goals (donations, volunteers—or—subscribers) in preparation for your first campaign.
  • How many? How much? Who? When? Where?
 
You might be able to sit down and do this assignment in 30 minutes. On the other hand, you may feel compelled to interview a few people in your organization—or perhaps share your first draft with a colleague for feedback.
 
 
 
1. Your simple list of a group of goals that you have chosen.
Last fall CSDi went through process of refining our goals for this coming year. Most of the general goals were the same from the previous year, but each year refinements have made them more and more specific.
 
Goals that I could work for the purposes of this course include goals for which we currently don’t have campaigns—or fundraising goals whose existing campaigns are dated and need a revision to meet current refinements.
 
Here is a list of goals that we want to develop:
New training programs
Thousands of people have enrolled in our training programs. Although we offer advanced training programs, we have discovered a niche for user-friendly, how-to, beginning nonprofit courses. An example of need could be: many nonprofits with newsletters have not learned how to grow their mailing lists—or send a take-action newsletter that will be opened by subscribers.
 
Fundraising goals: Donations from individuals
We’ve received a number of donations over the years from individuals who have found our website during a Google search process. However, we haven’t as of yet developed an online campaign targeted towards finding new donors.
 
Targeted newsletter subscriptions
Since we began getting serious about our newsletter five or six years ago, our list grew to around 25,000 subscribers. The vast majority of these subscribers found us on the Internet organically: meaning they were searching for something to do with nonprofits or development and stumbled across our website—and then signed up for our newsletter. The challenge with this is that it makes it difficult to target a subscription campaign to such a varied group.
 
Looking back to the beginning, we brought in 2,750 new subscribers in the first 18 months of list building. Since we’ve become more sophisticated at capturing subscribers, we feel that 3000 new subscribers brought in from a new campaign in 12 months is a safe guess.
 
We’re also going to try and segment these new subscribers into groups of 1) donors, 2) volunteers, and 3) people who are working in or would like to transition into the nonprofit world.
 
Our Goal List

So fundraising goals for this year are to set up a campaign aimed at several different focus groups and begin developing lists of clearly defined subscribers that we can send segmented newsletters that relate to their areas of interest.
 
2. Quantify your goals.
Goal: Participants in new training programs
  • Who: 1) Nonprofit professionals. 2) People hoping to transition into working with a nonprofit. 3) People who would like to start a nonprofit.
  • How many: 50 new people to enroll in new training programs. Since each person will take more than one course we would expect 100 enrollments.
  • How much: $150 per enrollment X 100 enrollments = $15,000.
  • When: over 12 months
  • Where: Enrollees will be from North America, the UK, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia.
 
Fundraising Goals: Donations from individuals
  • Who: Private Individuals hoping to positively impact challenges that nonprofits solve.
  • How many: 200 new donors.
  • How much: $100 average donation X 200 donors = $20,000.
  • When: over 12 months
  • Where: Donors will be from North America.
 
Goal: Targeted newsletter subscribers
  • Who: Nonprofit professionals. People hoping to transition into working with a nonprofit. People who would like to start a nonprofit.
  • How many: 3,000 new subscribers.
  • How much: N.A.
  • When: over 12 months
  • Where: subscribers will be from North America, the UK, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia.
 
3. Prioritization. For the purposes of this course, choose one of your goals that will be best for developing your first campaign.
 
After sharing the simple list of quantified goals with my coworkers, we decided to make our first priority for our next campaign:
 
Goal: Targeted newsletter subscribers
  • Who: 1) Nonprofit professionals. 2) People hoping to transition into working with a nonprofit. 3) People who would like to start a nonprofit.
  • How many: 3,000 new subscribers.
  • How much: N.A.
  • When: over 12 months
  • Where: subscribers will be from North America, the UK, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia.
 
We will use what we learn in the course to develop campaigns for the other two goals after the course ends.
Copyright © 2016, Tim Magee
 
 
 
CHAPTER 7. Marketing and Communications. Determine what to market to whom.
 
Guide 20 Your Market. Who are you hoping to reach in order to meet your fundraising goals?
Who are these new nonprofit supporters you are hoping to reach? What causes do they want to support?
 
Experience this chapter as part of a teacher led Nonprofit Fundraising Certificate Program. Each of these guides included in this chapter summarize a weekly assignment that has real tools for you to download, print out, edit, and use as templates over and over again in launching new initiatives.
 
This week, were going to jump right into the deep end of one of the most important parts about engaging with potential supporters of your organization. It will be an exercise in beginning to identify—very specifically—who they are.
 
This will probably not happen overnight, but developing a sense now of who your supporters could be and documenting that will give you a benchmark for future refinement.
 
So…. we might as well start off by being as specific as we can about our knowledge of who our supporters and potential supporters are. For the purposes of this course, I don’t mean for you to commission a company to perform an analysis! Let’s take this from a more practical standpoint—using basic information that you already probably have at hand.
 
Your Nonprofit: These could be examples (for simplicity) for your nonprofit:
  • Donors: First, you may need to clarify which donors that you want to focus on for your campaign—you can even break these into segmented groups that you can target. For the purposes of this course we’re going to focus on unique individuals as opposed to foundations. Here might be some typical examples:
    • Donors that you’ve met in your hometown from a local church. They tend to be retired couples and community-oriented. Average donations tend to be in the $50 to $100 range and are based on a specific call to action by the pastor—so you know what interests them.
    • The pastor in your hometown that initially provided an introduction to members of her congregation. She is in her early 60s and feels it is important for members of her congregation to feel a connection with and provide support to their local community.
    • A few people have made online donations to your website. You have their names (and consequently their gender) and the town they live in—but you don’t know much more about them. A simple SurveyMonkey survey could help here. Donations tend to be in the $100 range and the donation for a specific request made on your website—so you know what motivates them.
  • Volunteers: Again, you may need to clarify which type of volunteers you want to focus on for your campaign—and segment them into groups that you can target. Here might be some examples:
    • Adult volunteers. These tend to be retired women from your hometown that volunteer consistently for an ongoing position. On average, they tend to volunteer for between four and eight hours a month.
    • High school volunteers. These are 17 and 18-year-old students from your hometown who participate in annual consciousness-raising events such as a fall cleanup of a nearby park. These high school volunteers participate in one organizational meeting and for four hours during your annual cleanup. The receive their motivation from high school staff promoting community engagement.
    • Your high school contact that coordinates between your organization and the potential volunteers. She is 45, from your hometown, and a is full-time administrator whose role also includes community outreach.
    • University volunteers. They are 21 and 22-year-old students from a local college in your hometown who have a volunteer or internship requirement as part of the graduation process. They tend to work on one project during the course of a semester. These University volunteers volunteer for two hours a week over a three-month period.
    • Your University contact. She is an energetic 30-year-old woman who has a full-time job in the Office of External Relations.
 
So in this relatively simple list of supporters, you will have identified specific age ranges, gender, affiliations (such as schools universities and churches) their motivation (what specifically are they looking for!) location, donation levels and volunteer time investment.
 
All of this is incredibly important information for developing your initial campaign—and as you begin to refine these demographics over time with observation and new tools, this information will help you more carefully target your communications with supporters.
 
You also need to begin to develop a visual of your supporters (an avatar!) which is incredibly important as a visual tool during the writing process. Supporter photos can be extremely useful in firming up this visual tool.
 
I’m going to suggest that when you complete this week’s assignment that you put it together with the first assignment and put them into a notebook. Make sure each is dated. This will begin a set of templates which you can revise and improve upon over time so that one day when you decide to launch a new campaign you will have current and exacting information for making decisions.
 
Assignment Instructions. Getting started. So let’s get going. Here’s what we’re going to do in Guide 20.
 
The First Step in Guide 20.
First: Get specific about who your supporters are for the purpose of developing your campaign. You might identify supporters that are donors, volunteers, subscribers—or others?
 
Who are these new nonprofit supporters you are hoping to reach in order to meet your fundraising goals? What causes do they want to support?
  • Who are you hoping to reach in order to meet your fundraising goals?
  • Identify the type of person they are: We need a persona—or an avatar to visualize here!
  • Are they wealthy, needy, young, professional, retired?
  • What specifically are new supporters looking for?
  • What level of support can they provide?
  • Where are they located?
  • What groups might they be affiliated with that you can target?
  • Action: Create a description of the type of person they are: We need a persona—an avatar to visualize here!
 
You might be able to sit down and do this assignment in 30 minutes. On the other hand, you may feel compelled to interview a few people in your organization to clarify who your supporters are.
 
 
Use the section just below or this example document as your template for your assignment.
 
1. CSDi’s simple list of groups of supporters you have identified.
I sat down with of the goals that I listed in Assignment 1 and thought back through who the supporters were for each of the goals. In some cases (like the training programs) it was easy, because we have information about who they are, where they work, what they specifically do and what their motivations were for participating in a training program.
 
Donations were a bit more complicated, but we did have a name, gender, their location and donation amount.
 
Subscribers were also a bit complicated, but again, we had a name, gender, and their location. Plus, we also did a SurveyMonkey survey last year where we learned a little bit more about what their professions (donor, nonprofit staff, student, etc.) and what their nonprofit motivations were.
 
Relevant SurveyMonkey Newsletter Survey Results
52% women
7% 18 – 29 years
35% 30 – 49 years
55% 50 – 64
3% retired
4% Work for donor agency
20% Looking for a career transition
76% Work for a nonprofit
 
With information, we’re also going to try and segment these new subscribers into groups of 1) donors, 2) volunteers, and 3) people who are working in or would like to transition into the nonprofit world. Simply placing them into 3 different lists will help tremendously in refining our communications with them.
 
2. Here is a list of goals from last week and the information that we have about each of the goal’s supporters:
 
Goal: Participants in new training programs (North America)
  • Nonprofit staff (individuals) from small nonprofits; 25 to 40 years of age; 57% women; career advancement is motivation; North America
  • Nonprofit staff (individuals) from larger nonprofits; 30 to 50 years of age; 57% women; funding and program impact are the motivation; North America
  • Mid-sized nonprofits providing access to training for staff; 57% women; funding and program impact are the motivation; North America.
  • Individuals hoping to transition into a job in a nonprofit; 25 to 35 years of age; 57% women; new career in the nonprofit world is motivation; North America
 
Goal: Donations from individuals (North America)
  • Individual donors hoping to have a positive impact on the beneficiaries of nonprofit programs; 30 years to 70 years of age; 45% women; North America
  • Former training participants interested in supporting CSDi; 30 to 50 years of age; 45% women; North America
  • Google One Today donations; North America; no demographics
 
3. Prioritization. For the purposes of this course, focus on the supporters of the goal you chose for developing your first campaign in the previous assignment. This is the goal and a list of supporters we chose for this course.
 
My Prioritized Goal for the course and its supporter base: Targeted newsletter subscribers We were able to combine relevant information from our current subscribers and from our survey to find a market description:
  • Nonprofit staff (individuals) from small nonprofits; 25 to 40 years of age; 52% women; career advancement is motivation; North America
  • Nonprofit staff (individuals) from larger nonprofits; 30 to 50 years of age; 52% women; funding and program impact are the motivation; North America
  • Individuals hoping to transition into a job in a nonprofit; 25 to 35 years of age; 52% women; new career in the nonprofit world is motivation; North America
  • Individual donors hoping to have a positive impact on the beneficiaries of nonprofit programs; 30 years to 70 years of age; 45% women; North America
 
Copyright © 2016, Tim Magee
 
 
 
CHAPTER 7. Marketing and Communications. Determine what to market to whom.
 
Guide 21 Your Story in Sound Bites. What does your nonprofit do?
 
Specifically, in a sound bite, let’s make this sound attractive to your new, potential supporters.
 
Experience this chapter as part of a teacher led Nonprofit Fundraising Certificate Program. Each of these guides included in this chapter summarize a weekly assignment that has real tools for you to download, print out, edit, and use as templates over and over again in launching new initiatives.
 
This week, were going to jump right into the deep end of one of the next most important parts of your communications strategy needed for engaging with potential supporters of your organization. It will be an exercise in beginning to identify—very specifically—who you are.
 
Over several weeks in Chapter 7 we are in the process of documenting 1) who your potential supporters are, 2) who your organization is, 3) what your potential supporters are asking for, and 4) how you can describe what you do in a manner that provides THE answer for what they’re asking for. These four steps will give you the ammunition that you need to write targeted campaigns that will get your ideal supporters to go to your website—and engage with you.
 
So…. we might as well start off by being as specific as we can about what your organization can offer supporters in the single campaign goal that you chose to focus on in over the past two assignments.
 
This could be an example (for simplicity) for your nonprofit that you may have prioritized over the past two assignments:
 
Grow your Mailing list: Use the initial information about the motivations of your current supporters that would lead new supporters to consider subscribing to your newsletter.
1. Current Donors that you’ve met in your hometown from a local church. Motivation based on a specific call to action by the pastor. Let’s say that the pastor has raised their interest in a local food bank. What does your organization do that could further engage them?
  • Your food pantry serves 2,500 unique individuals living in poverty each year.
  • Your organization has been doing this for 14 years.
  • You have three convenient food bank locations.
  • You focus on young families with children and house-bound elderly members of the community.
  • You partner with local grocery stores and restaurants. This provides an unusual and very welcome variety of food for your clients—and reduces food waste for your partners.
  • You have heartwarming stories of individual clients—and photos too!
 
2. Current Adult volunteers. These tend to be retired women from your hometown that volunteer consistently for an ongoing position. On average, they tend to volunteer for between four and eight hours a month. They are motivated by having something meaningful to do, by regular contact with fellow volunteers, by regular contact with food bank clients, by learning new things about need, nutrition, and learning about the food waste complexities faced by restaurants and grocery stores. What does your organization do that could further engage them?
  • You have fulfilling volunteer positions at the food bank.
  • You have been working with volunteers for 14 years.
  • 80% of volunteers stay for over 2 years.
  • You currently work with a regular group of 24 food bank volunteers.
  • You offer flexible, accommodating hours for volunteers.
  • You provide transportation from the church to the food banks.
  • There are regular, returning clients for volunteers to get to know.
  • Volunteers can take home food too.
  • Interesting, quarterly presentations by specialists such as physicians, nutritionists, social workers, restauranteurs, and donor agencies so that volunteers can continue learning about the importance of what they do.
3. Current Mailing List Subscribers. Topics of interest indicated by current subscribers.
  • You serve 2,500 unique people a year.
  • Hunger isn’t a problem in your community: malnutrition is.
  • Nutrition: Your program is designed to fill the gap for clients between undernutrition and a well nourished clients.
  • Volunteers deliver food to 75 house-bound elderly community members per week.
  • Personalized birthday cakes are provided for client children in partnership with several grocery stores.
  • You have human interest stories and photos of people in your partnering restaurants and grocery stores.
  • You have heartwarming stories of individual clients—and photos too!
 
So in this relatively simple list, you will have identified specific sound bites that illustrate what your nonprofit does well that will answer the wants, needs motivations, questions and burning causes that your supporters have. Highlighting these points of interest in your newsletter, website—and in your communications copy can lead to increasing numbers of subscribers.
 
All of this information can be used for developing your initial campaign. However, over the next few weeks we will use this initial list of your unique services as a base to begin refining your Unique Selling Propositions (USP) to really match what your new, potential supporters are looking for.
 
I’m going to suggest that when you complete this week’s assignment that you put it together with the first two assignments and put them into a notebook. Make sure each is dated. This will continue developing your set of templates which you can revise and improve upon over time so that one day when you decide to launch a new campaign you will have current and exacting information for making decisions.
 
Getting started.
So let’s get going. Here’s what we’re going to do this week.
 
The First Step
First: Get specific about who your organization is for the purpose of developing a new campaign. Focus your list of things that you do well in the eyes of the supporters that you identified last week.
 
What does your nonprofit do?
Specifically, in a sound bite, let’s make this sound attractive to your new supporters.
  • What are your causes’ challenges?
  • What are your nonprofit’s solutions?
  • Who benefits—or what causes benefit?
  • Are your solutions enduring?
  • What is your unique selling proposition (USP)?
 
You might be able to sit down and do this assignment in 30 minutes. On the other hand, you may feel compelled to interview a few people in your organization to clarify your unique selling propositions are.
 
 
Use this Document as your template for your assignment.
This Assignment’s Example.
 
1. CSDi’s simple list of groups of supporters that I identified organized by my prioritized goal from the past two assignments.
I copied the prioritized goal and its supporters that I listed in Assignment 2.
 
Prioritized Goal: Targeted newsletter subscribers. North America.
  • Nonprofit staff (individuals) from small nonprofits; 25 to 40 years of age; 52% women; career advancement is motivation; North America
  • Nonprofit staff (individuals) from larger nonprofits; 30 to 50 years of age; 52% women; funding and program impact are the motivation; North America
  • Individuals hoping to transition into a job in a nonprofit; 25 to 35 years of age; 52% women; new career in the nonprofit world is motivation; North America
  • Individual donors hoping to have a positive impact on the beneficiaries of nonprofit programs; 30 years to 70 years of age; 45% women; North America
 
2. Get specific about what your nonprofit does in a way that will answer the wants, needs, motivations, questions and burning causes that your supporters have. Write in sound bites specific to each type of supporter as listed above.
Who? Goal: Targeted newsletter subscribers in North America
Nonprofit staff (individuals) from small nonprofits; 25 to 40 years of age; 52% women; career advancement is motivation; North America

Sound Bites:

  • CSDi has provided distance learning and workshop training over eight years for 4000 professionals.
  • Course projects launched by participants have impacted over 400,000 people.
  • CSDi staff have provided consulting services for over 100 nonprofits
  • Training programs can be chosen for these different career specializations:
  • program design
  • project management
  • organizational management
  • donor communication
  • program funding
  • impact analysis
 
Who: Nonprofit staff (individuals) from larger nonprofits; 30 to 50 years of age; 52% women; funding and program impact are the motivation; North America.
  • CSDi has provided distance, blended, and workshop training for eight years to 4000 professionals.
  • Course projects launched by participants have impacted over 400,000 people.
  • CSDi staff have provided consulting services for over 500 nonprofits
  • Training programs can be chosen for these different career specializations:
  • program design
  • project management
  • organizational management
  • donor communication
  • program funding
  • impact analysis
 
Who: Individuals hoping to transition into a job in a nonprofit; 25 to 35 years of age; 52% women; new career in the nonprofit world is motivation; North America
  • CSDi has provided distance, blended, and workshop training for eight years to 4000 professionals.
  • Course projects launched by participants have impacted over 400,000 people.
  • Training programs can be chosen for these different career specializations:
  • program design
  • project management
  • organizational management
  • donor communication
  • program funding
  • impact analysis
 
Who: Individual donors hoping to have a positive impact on the beneficiaries of nonprofit programs; 30 years to 70 years of age; 45% women; North America.
 
Training participants have launched projects that impacted over 400,000 people using 270 different kinds of activities including:
  • social services
  • community development
  • education
  • the environment
  • social justice
  • senior assistance programs
  • recycling
  • urban agriculture
  • skills training
  • adaptation to climate change
  • alternative energy
 
So now you have a series of bullet points about specific areas of interest that your nonprofit does for different types of supporters. From the first half of this assignment you have newsworthy features and benefits.
 
Combined you can create sound bites for different campaigns: keywords, landing page titles and newsletter subject lines.
Copyright © 2016, Tim Magee
 
 
In the next chapter (Chapter 8) we’re going to learn how to plan a campaign—and then launch one
 
Enjoy. See you next week.
 
Want to enjoy this chapter’s learning process with a teacher? See the online, teacher-led courses behind this chapter.
 
Get free access to the Beginner’s Guide to Online Donations here. Each of the 10 chapters includes 3 individual, step-by-step guides to boosting online fundraising: 30 guides in total. See the syllabus.
Get the online donations book button
Copyright © 2018, Tim Magee